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The University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

Department of Animal Science

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Faculty and Staff » Dr. Cheryl J. Kojima (formerly Cheryl Dyer)


Dr. Cheryl J. Kojima
Associate Professor

Education

Cornell University, Animal Science B.S. 1988
University of Missouri, Animal Science Ph.D. 1997
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Animal Physiology 1997-2000

Professional Interest: Animal Genetics and Genomics

Dr. Kojima’s research is focused on elucidating pathways of gene expression adversely affected by stress of weaning and obesity in the pig. The process of weaning can be detrimental to growth, immune function, and overall well-being of the young pig. Through understanding what happens during weaning at the molecular level to influence appetite and immune function, her laboratory aims to develop new strategies to minimize the negative effects of weaning thereby increasing overall well-being and production efficiency in swine. Obesity-related research is also being conducted using the Grad StudentsSinclair minipig, which is an excellent model for studying human physiological responses to obesity including cardiovascular disease, insulin insensitivity, and inflammation. Currently Dr. Kojima is using the minipig model to discern the effects of Omega-3 fatty acids on adipocyte-mediated inflammation, with particular interest in how various adipose depots differ in their response to Omega-3 supplementation.

Selected Publications:

Accepted

  • Bastin BC, Houser A, Bagley CP, Ely KM, Payton RR, Saxton AM, Schrick FN, Waller JC, Kojima CJ. Accepted 2013.  A polymorphism in XKR4 is significantly associated with serum prolactin concentrations in beef cows grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue. Animal Genetics, in press.
  • Campbell BT, Kojima CJ, Cooper TA, Bastin BC, Wojakiewicz L, Kallenbach RL, Schrick FN,  Waller JC.  Accepted 2013. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the dopamine receptor D2 gene may be informative for resistance to fescue toxicosis in Angus-based cattle. Animal Biotechnology, in press.

Recently Published

  • Hamill JJ, Sunderland JJ, LeBlanc AK, Kojima CJ, Wall J, Martin EB. 2013. Evaluation of CT-based lean-body SUV. Med Phys. 40(9):092504.
  • Pighetti GM, Kojima CJ, Wojakiewicz L, Rambeaud M. 2012. The bovine CXCR1 gene is highly polymorphic. Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 145(1-2):464-70.
  • Cooper TA, Jenkins SJ, Wojakiewicz L, Kattesh HG, Kojima CJ. 2011. Effects of weaning and syndyphalin-33 on expression of melanocortinergic appetite-regulating genes in swine. Domest Anim Endocrinol. 40(3):165-72.
  • Cooper TA, Roberts MP, Kattesh HG, and Kojima CJ. 2009. Effects of transport stress, sex, and weaning weight on postweaning performance in pigs. Prof. Anim. Sci. 25:189-194.
  • Jenkins SJ, Cooper TA, Roberts MP, Mathew AG, Carroll JA, Kattesh HG, Kojima CJ.  2009.  Effects of syndyphalin-33 on immune function during a salmonella challenge in recently weaned pigs.  J. Anim. Vet. Adv. 8(12):2562-2567.
  • Kojima CJ, Jenkins SJ, Cooper TA, Roberts MP, Carroll JA, Kattesh HG. 2009. Effects of syndyphalin-33 on feed intake and circulating measures of growth hormone, cortisol, and immune cell populations in the recently weaned pig. J Anim Sci. 87(10):3218-25.
  • Daniel JA, Carroll JA, Keisler DH, and Kojima CJ. 2008. Evaluation of immune system function in neonatal pigs born vaginally or by Cesarean section. Domest Anim Endocrinol. 35:81-7.
  • Kojima CJ, Kattesh HG, Roberts MP, and Sun T. 2008. Physiological and immunological responses to weaning and transport in the young pig: modulation by administration of porcine ST. J Anim Sci. 86:2913-9.
  • Adcock RJ, Kattesh HG, Roberts MP, Carroll JA, Saxton AM, and Kojima CJ. 2007. Temporal relationships between plasma cortisol, corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), and the free cortisol index (FCI) in pigs in response to adrenal stimulation or suppression. Stress 10:305-10.
  • Kojima CJ, Carroll JA, Matteri RL, Touchette KJ, and Allee GL. 2007. Effects of weaning and piglet size on neuroendocrine regulators of feed intake. J Anim Sci. 85:2133-9.


Cheryl J. Kojima